The starting point for the development of the operational guidelines was the establishment of the baseline chronological activities, typically related to an incident response. In order to facilitate discussions and reach consensus on the framework, a flowchart of a typical incident scenario was established with the contract elements application project. (See Annex 1). Four major core activities were proposed: “Environmental risks in Arctic regions have increased in recent decades. International cooperation creates the necessary conditions for the protection of the marine environment from oil pollution,” said Jorma Rytkönen of SYKE, the Finnish Environment Institute, the public authority that organises the exercise. 1. This Agreement shall apply to oil pollution incidents that may occur in or pose a threat to a maritime area over which a State whose Government is a Party to this Agreement exercises its sovereignty, prerogatives or jurisdiction, including its internal waters, territorial sea, exclusive economic zone and continental shelf, in accordance with international law and beyond a southern border: The recognition that the Guidelines are not binding and, therefore, that they do not intend to establish or modify an obligation for the Parties under the Agreement or international law. In addition, the guidelines should not have a negative impact on existing binational or multilateral contingency plans and on the implementation of joint responses under those plans. b. Provide assistance, coordination and cooperation in response operations involving more than one Party, including in areas outside the jurisdiction of a State; “This exercise provided an excellent overview of the partnership that is the EPPR. We worked together to develop a training process that would not only involve the United States as team leader, but also used a Norwegian scenario organized by Canada in Montreal and evaluated by representatives from Canada and Finland. In this way, we have put in place a better process that will further enhance this multilateral forum whose primary objective is to ensure the protection of the Arctic marine environment.” 24-hour national operational operational contact points responsible for receiving and transmitting oil pollution reports; and the Russian Federation — maritime areas above the coasts of the White Sea, the Barents Sea, the Kara Sea, Lake Laptew, the East Siberian Sea and Lake Chukchi, as well as the mouths of rivers flowing to those seas, upstream of the baselines from which the width of the coastal sea is measured; This section describes the need to integrate the operations of interested parties and the role of the liaison officer in the context of the requesting party`s response system.

This includes the integration of these functions into any existing bilateral or multilateral command and control systems or protocols. It covers the general principles of application and focuses on the integration of resources. Although not explicitly specified, this section covers the execution and eventual completion of the operational response phase, including the next section. For more information Arctic Coast Guard Forum International Response to Arctic Oil Pollution Exercise and Seminar v. then immediately inform all States whose interests are or will be likely to be affected by such an oil pollution incident, as well as the intensification of commercial maritime activities in the Arctic requires improved oil pollution planning and preparedness in order to respond to the challenges of responding to oil spills in the Arctic. Representatives of the eight Arctic Member States work in different forums and working groups to reduce risks and ensure safe and environmentally friendly activities in the Arctic.. . . .