Concerned correctional workers in provincial prisons, who are hit with COVID-19 escalation cases, are calling for better protective equipment to keep them safe on the job. “This is one of the reasons why [Gawronsky] fought so hard for the Dauphin prison and why corrections have been so often in the news. She knows that this is her best chance to assume the presidency. Bronwyn Dobchuk-Land is a criminal law assistant at the University of Winnipeg and a collective member of Bar None, a Winnipeg-based prisoner solidarity group. Winnipeg (Jan 15, 2010) – Manitoba Correction officers (COs) and sheriffs are following the example of Winnipeg police officers in making work training time a topic of negotiation. After a three-day walk, the government acknowledged most of the demands and put an end to union action. A recent corrective worker said in an interview that “we achieved a pretty impressive improvement in terms of personnel and security after the release.” But less than six months later, the union said the province apologized for not solving the problems that led to the riots. Overcrowding has always been a stick to calling for new prisons, but it gained even more force after the riots. “In the past, they have tried to incorporate a fitness subsidy into their collective agreements [and] with negotiations around the corner, it is guaranteed that this issue will reappear,” says John Baert, a spokesman for the Manitoba Union of Government Employees (MGEU/NUPGE). All of this is related to the recent loss of nearly 9,000 members by the MGEU due to a consolidation of the provincially imposed tariff units in the health sector. Another store manager, who asked to remain anonymous, told us that home nurses, almost exclusively women, were once the most militant part of the union – and represented the base of Gawronsky, the current president of the union.

With the loss of home care personnel, particularly at the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), corrective agents are now the best organized part of the union. A prison officer is currently the union`s first vice-president, which is the second highest role in the executive. Another prison officer has announced that he will run for the presidency of the union at the next convention in October 2020. One of the shop managers we spoke to admitted: “Total is part of the reason [Gawronsky] fought so hard for the Dauphin prison and why corrections were so frequent on the news. She knows that this is her best chance to assume the presidency. With the loss of home care personnel, particularly at the Canadian Union of Public Employees (CUPE), corrective agents are now the best organized part of the union.